Jaye’s Week ( In the garden, not the Office)

Yesterday afternoon I had planned on writing and working on a trailer for one of Anita’s books, but the sun was shining, and I couldn’t be asked.

We sat outside, drinking coffee, surrounded by all the jobs I have been neglecting so far this year. Not really my fault, for the weather hasn’t exactly been conducive for gardening lately. It’s either been freezing cold, raining, or both. So, I wasn’t feeling too guilty.

Maybe a little guilty about some of my bonsai perhaps, as there are a couple that desperately need repotting as they have used up all the goodness in their soil. There was also an orange blossom that I bought earlier in the year that has outgrown its pot.

Before I knew it, I was hard at work, and enjoying every minute.

I was also promising to spend a lot more time in the garden in future.

My favourite, at the moment

They say you are closer to God’s heart in a garden, and all I know is I am always happier when up to my elbows in rich garden soil, surrounded by all the wonders of nature.

I thought I would close with some of my favourite bonsai, the acres. Especially the ones with different colour variations in the leaves. I love the Lacy ones too and have included the one that refused to be a bonsai. It outgrew every pot I put it in, and eventually I planted it in the garden.

I hate to say this, but in a way, I hoped it would rain tomorrow so I could catch up on my writing! (or maybe not!)

So, You Just Got a Bonsai…

01 Friday Jan 2021

Posted by acstratten in Bonsai

Tags

begin, beginner, Bonsai, first steps, getting started, new, start

You got your first bonsai. Congratulations! Welcome to the wonderful world of bonsai care. Maybe your bonsai was a gift, maybe it was an impulse buy, or maybe you’ve been considering it for quite a while. Whatever the case, there is a lot we should talk about so let’s get started.

Example post from a new bonsai owner.

I don’t want to alarm you, but caring for a bonsai is a lot of responsibility, not unlike owning a pet. A plant dying might not seem as traumatic as an animal dying (some bonsai enthusiasts will disagree), but like a pet a bonsai depends on you to provide for its every need. With proper care a bonsai can live much longer than your dog, your cat, or even your parrot! And frankly, there is A LOT to learn and understand.

Continue reading

for a very interesting and helpful post on caring for your first bonsai…

Another post from Nebari Bonsai…

Losing trees, Japanese Maple

Brian VFJapanese Maple, Losing Trees May 8, 2021 1 Minute

Almost, anyway. The aggressive wiring, followed by exceptional freezing conditions in January 2020 resulted in a disastrous year for this Japanese Maple. Here it is in December, 2020, as most of the leaves have fallen:

Continue reading over at NEBARI BONSAI to watch the progress on this poor tree!

Another Fascinating/Unusual Bonsai Post…

Just a plain old willow leaf ficus…

Here’s an example of a little tree that you might run across easily, at a retail store or maybe your club’s raffle table. Hell, I’ve seen them at Walmart before. It’s a willow leaf ficus, Ficus salicaria (often misnamed Ficus nerifolia, F. Salicifolia, F. Subulata, et al).

This one happens to be a root cutting , meaning the “trunk” used to be a root off a larger tree that was chopped off during a repot, saving the smaller hair roots, and planted in its own pot.

continue reading what happened to this unusual tree at Adam’s Art & Bonsai Blog

Reblogged from Begin Bonsai

New pot for a Port Jackson fig! (Ficus rubiginosa)

0 Written by dkinzey

Last weekend I repotted my Port Jackson fig from terra-cotta into a proper Japanese bonsai pot by Koyo. I started developing this tree from a sprig in January, 2015. For a progression of the tree from then to August 2020 see: https://beginbonsai.net/2019/03/31/port-jackson-fig-ficus-rubiginosa/

April 17, 2021:
The tree today in its new pot.
January, 2015: The tree when first purchased in 2015.

Continue reading this interesting post over at BEGIN BONSAI

Another Nebari Bonsai lesson…

Bud pinching Japanese Maples

Brian VFDeciduous, Japanese Maple April 17, 2021 1 Minute

In the spring, with healthy Japanese maples, bud-pinching is a common technique to keep internodes short on refined trees. It is a simple procedure, and needs to be performed about daily as Japanese maples are waking up in the spring.

The earlier you can identify the 2nd node and remove it, the shorter the internode will remain. In this example, I’ve waited about a day too long, but it helps illustrate the process.

Here is the extending new shoot:

Continue reading this interesting post over at NEBARI BONSAI

A journey with small trees with BeginBonsai.net

Olive (Olea europaea, var. ‘SanFernando’)

0 Written by dkinzey

I have been working on this olive since July, 2011. To see a progression of its development from 2011 to early 2019 see https://beginbonsai.net/2019/01/03/olive-olea-europaea-var-sanfernando/.

February 21, 2021:
The tree today.

Visit BEGINBONSAI.NET to see more wonderful bonsai specimens!